How to Repave a Concrete Driveway

It’s not uncommon for concrete driveways to show signs of wear and tear after a few years. If your driveway is starting to look worn down, you may be considering repaving it. Like any other type of driveway, concrete driveways can begin to degrade over time because of exposure to the elements and vehicle and foot traffic. It’s preferable to repair a damaged or destroyed installation than to start from the ground up, especially if you’re already invested in it.

Repaving a concrete driveway is a big job, but it’s not too difficult if you know what you’re doing. In this article, we’ll walk you through the steps of repaving a concrete driveway.

Here’s how to do it.

Materials Required

  • Concrete mix
  • Paving stones or bricks
  • Wheelbarrow
  • Trowel
  • Tamper
  • Level
  • Shovels
  • Rakes
  • Hose or watering can.

Why Repave?

Before you begin repaving your concrete driveway, it’s important to ask yourself why you’re doing it. Is your driveway cracked or damaged? Are there large weeds growing through the concrete? Or is your driveway just starting to look worn down after years of use?

If your answer is that your driveway is starting to look a little worn down, repaving may not be necessary. You may get away with simply power washing and sealing your driveway. However, if your driveway is cracked or damaged, repaving is the best way to repair it.

The kind of resurface that should be used

The kind of Re-surfacer that should be used is based on the concrete condition and the weather conditions at the time of repair.

If you are repairing a driveway that has been damaged by oil, gas, or other chemicals, you will need to use an epoxy-based resurface. If your driveway has developed large potholes or is severely cracked, you will need to use a cement-based resurface.

And if you’re simply looking to give your driveway a facelift, you can use either an epoxy- or cement-based resurface.

Cement-based resurfaces are best applied in cool weather, while epoxy-based Re-surfacers can be applied in both cool and warm weather. The resurfaces should be applied when the temperature is between 50- and 90-degrees Fahrenheit, and there should be no chance of rain for at least 24 hours.

Types of Resurfacing

Overlay

An overlay is a thin layer of new concrete applied over the existing driveway. This is usually the best option for driveways with minor cracks or damage.

Full-depth 

A full-depth repair is a more invasive option that involves removing the top layer of concrete and replacing it with new concrete. This is usually the best option for driveways with major cracks or damage.

Geo cells

These are newer types of driveway resurfaces that involve installing small plastic cells on the driveway’s surface. These cells are filled with gravel or soil, which helps to stabilize the driveway and prevents it from cracking.

If your driveway is severely cracked or damaged, you may want to consider using geocells to Repair it.

Geogrid

If your driveway is severely cracked or damaged, you may want to consider using a geogrid to Repair it. A geogrid is a metal frame installed on the driveway’s surface. The frame is filled with concrete, which helps to stabilize the driveway and prevents it from cracking.

The Pros and Cons of Repaving Your Driveway

Repaving your driveway is a big job, but it’s not without its benefits. Repaving your driveway can extend the life of your driveway, improve its appearance, and increase its value. However, repaving your driveway is also an expensive and time-consuming process.

If you’re considering repaving your driveway, weigh the pros and cons to decide if it’s the right decision for you.

The pros of repaving

  • Extends the life of your driveway
  • Improves the appearance of your home
  • Increases the value of your home

The cons of repaving:

  • It’s an expensive process
  • It’s a time-consuming process
  • You’ll need to avoid driving on your driveway for a few days while it dries (depending on the quality)

The Process of Repaving a Concrete Driveway

Clean Your Driveway

The first step in repaving your driveway is to clean it thoroughly. Remove all debris, including leaves, sticks, and rocks. Use a broom to sweep the driveway’s surface clean, or use a high-pressure water hose to wash away all dirt and oil that is steeped in the cement.

You may also need to use a power washer to remove stubborn dirt or stains. Be sure to read the manufacturer’s instructions on using the power washer safely before using it. If your driveway is severely cracked or potholed, you may want to use a jackhammer or power drill to break up the concrete. This will make it easier to apply the Re-surfacer.

Remove the Old Driveway

If the driveway is beyond repair and unpleasant to look at, it would be best to remove the old driveway. You can do this yourself with a shovel and a wheelbarrow. Start by shoveling up any loose concrete, then use the wheelbarrow to remove it from the area.

If your driveway is severely cracked or potholed, you may want to use a jackhammer or power drill to break up the concrete. This will make it easier to apply the Re-surfacer.

[Note: If the driveway is in good condition, you can skip this step.]

Prepare the Base

Once you’ve removed the old driveway, you’ll need to prepare the base for the new one. Start by leveling the area with a shovel. Then, use a tamper to compact the soil.

If you’re using a cement-based Re-surfacer, you’ll need to mix up a batch of concrete and pour it into the area. Use a trowel to spread the concrete evenly. Fill a five-gallon bucket with three and a half quarts of water. Then, while operating the mixing paddle in the bucket, slowly pour in the Re-surfacer. Add the rest of the ingredients and continue mixing for at least five minutes afterward. Add more water if the mix is too thick; add more Re-surfacer if it’s too thin. Only after the substance has been lump-free and resembles syrup should you stop. If you’re using an epoxy-based Re-surfacer, you can skip this step.

Also See: How to Remove Stains from Concrete | Tips for Painting Concrete Floor

Lay the Paving Stones

The next step is to lay the paving stones or bricks. Start at one end of the driveway and work your way to the other. Make sure that each stone is level before moving on to the next one.

If you’re using paving stones, it’s best to use a mortar mix to attach them to the driveway.

First, wet the area where the stone will be placed. Then, spread a layer of mortar on top of the wet concrete and place the stone in the mortar. Use a trowel to smooth out the mortar and remove any.

If you’re using paving stones, make sure that the joints between the stones are filled with concrete. This will help to keep them in place over time.

Apply the Re-surfacer

Once the paving stones are in place, it’s time to apply the Re-surfacer. Start by mixing up a batch of Re-surfacer according to the instructions on the package. Then, using a shovel, spread the Re-surfacer evenly over the driveway’s surface. Make sure to get it into all the cracks and potholes.

Use a rake to smooth out the resurfacing. Be careful not to scrape off any of the paving stones or bricks. Once the Re-surfacer is dry, you can apply a sealant. This will help to protect it from weathering and staining.

Finish the Edges

Once you’ve laid all the paving stones, finish the edges by using a trowel to smooth out the mortar. Then, use a brush to clean up any mortar spilled onto the driveway. Once the mortar is dry, you can apply a sealant. This will help to protect it from weathering and staining.

Let it Dry

Once you’ve finished laying the paving stones, let them dry for 24 hours. After they’ve dried, you can apply a sealant to protect them from weathering and staining. However, the new surface will be ready for foot traffic in around six hours in most cases.

See Also: Ways to Cover a Brick Fireplace

Conclusion

Now that you know how to repave a concrete driveway put your knowledge to use and give your driveway a facelift. With a little hard work, you can have a brand-new-looking driveway.

FAQs

How long does it take for the Re-surfacer to dry?

It depends on the type of Re-surfacer you use. In most cases, it will be ready for foot traffic in around six hours. However, it’s best to let it dry for 24 hours before applying a sealant.

Can I drive on my driveway right after I resurface it?

You can drive on your driveway right after you resurface it in most cases. However, we recommend waiting at least six hours before doing so.

Can I use an epoxy-based Re-surfacer if I have a cracked driveway?

Yes, you can use epoxy-based Re-surfacer if you have a cracked driveway. However, you will need to use a mortar mix to attach the paving stones or bricks.

How often do I need to resurface my driveway?

It depends on the condition of your driveway. If it’s in good condition, you may only need to resurface it every few years. However, if it’s in bad condition, you may need to resurface it every year.

How can I prevent my driveway from cracking?

There are a few things you can do to prevent your driveway from cracking, such as:

  • Seal your driveway every year
  • Repair any cracks as soon as they appear
  • Use an epoxy-based Re-surfacer.
Written by


Rostislav Shetman is the founder of 9Kilo Moving. He has been in the moving and relocation industry for more than 25 years, making him an expert in his field. Rostislav started as a helper, dispatcher and driver and has worked his way up to owning his own company. He takes great pride in his work and enjoys helping people relocate across the United States of America. When he's not working, Rostislav enjoys spending time with his family and friends. They are the light of his life and bring him happiness every day.