man thinking about when to move

Whether you own or rent a home, there are specific times of the year that are better for moving than others. Some of this information is based on moving costs and availability. In the end, your personal situation will dictate the best time to move. Take a look at the latest tips for moving at the right time. Securing the perfect home is possible with strategic planning.

Following list can help you determine the best time for you to relocate:

  1. Skip the Summer
  2. As Colleges Let Out
  3. Winter Beats Them All
  4. Fall and Spring Perks
  5. Watching the Weather
  6. Avoiding the Holidays
  7. The 1st and 30th Dilemmas
  8. Taking a Week Off
  9. Be an Early Riser
  10. Factoring in Careers and School
  11. Considering Wintertime Negotiations
  12. Seeing More Options

CALCULATE MY MOVE

1. Skip the Summer

It’s a fact that mostly all regions consider summer as the busiest time of year for moving. As demand for movers goes up, the prices will rise. There will be fewer movers to cover all of the regional transitions too.

Ideally, choose any other time of year to move. The summer is popular because children are out of school, and the weather is ideal. Most parents don’t want to move their children during the school year because it’s too difficult to switch neighborhoods and start new schools midyear.

Although the weather might be ideal in theory, moving during the summer can be difficult when temperatures rise as well. There might be a heat wave moving through the area, for instance. The move becomes a difficult time as you and the movers fight off exhaustion and heat-related illnesses.

2. As Colleges Let Out

If you live in a city or small town with a college, your housing options may be limited during the school year. Be aware of when the college lets out for the summer. In fact, the date may be closer to the springtime than the summer anyway.

Graduation day and afterward means that students are moving out of the area. Apartments and houses alike will suddenly need residents. For these types of areas, moving when colleges let out is the best time. Landlords are excited to have an influx of new renters, which might lead to lower rates.

Be aware of short leases, however. If the landlord wants the college students to fill the apartments in the fall, you may be in for another move. Ask for at least a 12-month lease in these cases.

3. Winter Beats Them All

The best time to move when you’re concerned with cost is winter. Movers tend to see their slowest times during this season. Because they’re trying to fill their schedules, they’ll often offer the lowest rates of the year. This fact might translate to a low-cost weekend move too.

Work with several movers in order to compare prices. If one company knows that you have a lower offer, they might match it. Creating a bidding scenario for your business is only possible in the winter. Think of this season as a buyer’s marketplace. Any other time of year will give the movers the upper hand. You drive their business during the winter, so don’t hesitate to ask about discounts and encourage negotiations. If you find it difficult to shortlist the movers then this list of top moving companies will help you choose one.

CALCULATE MY MOVE

4. Fall and Spring Perks

If winter is the best and summer is the worst for moves, the two other seasons should also be considered in your calculations too. They can be thought of as solid, secondary selections. The fall works well for people without children. As soon as school is in, the moving business quickly slows down. Families don’t want major changes during the school year.

You can find open dates and reasonable prices in the fall, especially before the holidays set in. Don’t overlook the beauty of spring either. If you’re selling a home, early birds might find an eager buyer before summer’s inventory explodes in numbers. You can move in the spring before prices rise.

Both of these seasons have their advantages and drawbacks. It’s a personal decision if you’re basing the best moving time on the seasons. Understanding how your schedule works with regional calendars, such as school years and upcoming events, will guide your decision.

5. Watching the Weather

The best time to move is when the weather is mild. No rain or snow should be in the forecast. Luckily, there are 15-day forecasts that can guide your choice of a moving day. When you move during the winter, selecting a good-weather day is paramount to success.

Consider your region’s weather patterns as you narrow down a moving day. If your winter is normally cool without any major issues, schedule a desired date without too much concern. Be more careful with volatile weather, however. The movers might reschedule you if the work is too treacherous, such as when sleet or hail is involved.

6. Avoiding the Holidays

Don’t schedule a move during a holiday weekend. This practice is actually the worst time to move. The holiday may open up a few days off for you, but the movers might charge you overtime. Many federal holidays require employers to pay their workers a higher wage than normal. Those additional costs are often offset by higher premiums for your move.

As a clever strategy, schedule the move either right before the holiday or just afterward. Many movers will have open schedules at those times. You also take advantage of the days off for packing or unpacking. Avoiding the extra fees is always a bonus.

Be careful if you’re trying to move around Christmas and New Year’s Day. These holidays are so close together that they might require a premium anyway. Simply ask for specific quotes on your chosen days to see the differences.

CALCULATE MY MOVE

7. The 1st and 30th Dilemmas

Moving at the beginning or end of any month will always be expensive and busy. Most rentals and leases use these days as their endpoints. Try to work outside of these parameters, however. If you must be out by the 30th of the month, create your own deadline of the 15th instead. Although you’re technically paying for two extra weeks at your old residence, you’ll save money with the move overall.

If the move is relatively close in proximity, use this extra time as a way to clean up the old residence before the new tenants move in. For a rental, you might gain most of your cleaning deposit back. Moving in a rush at the end of the month doesn’t give you enough time to really wipe the property down.

8. Taking a Week Off

The best time to move is during the weekdays. Many people think that moving the entire household over a weekend is possible, but you’ll pay a premium for this service. Schedule the move between Monday and Thursday. Give yourself a break by taking the whole week off. The move can occur on one or two days, which gives you the rest of the week to unpack and settle into the new home.

Ideally, select Monday or Tuesday as your moving day. Movers will have completed their weekend appointments, and they might be short on appointments as the workweek arrives. There may even be a discount on your appointment too. Every mover will have a different volume of clients.

9. Be an Early Riser

If you take a magnifying lens and place it on the best time to move on your chosen day, the early morning wins out every time. Depending on the moving company, they’ll want to be at your property by 7 or 8 a.m. The early morning gives the movers enough time to put all of your belongings onto the truck, haul the goods and install them at the new home. This time frame is specific to in-town moves only, however.

Moving companies don’t often arrive any earlier than 7 a.m. This unwritten rule is simply a courtesy to your neighbors. Moving trucks can be noisy. They want to arrive at a reasonable time for everyone. It’s very rare if a moving company will suggest an afternoon appointment time. Most of the productive day is gone by then.

CALCULATE MY MOVE

10. Factoring in Careers and School

The best time to move may not be in your control. Take a look at your personal life, including career goals and children’s schedules. When it comes to a move built around a job promotion, you might have some say about when the move occurs. Request a time that works for your entire family.

In other cases, however, your supervisor needs an immediate move from you. Your employer should pay for these moving costs because they’ll probably be at a premium as a “rush” appointment. Move as a single person or transition the entire family at the same time. There is some flexibility to your move with these two scenarios. For example, the employee might move right now with the family joining him or her when the time is right.

Don’t forget that changing schools midyear is often disruptive at any grade level. If you must move, choosing semester breaks or summertime will be the best choices even with the high prices.

11. Considering Wintertime Negotiations

You may be thrilled with a wintertime move. In fact, there’s another perk to this season. It’s a fact that many people don’t want to move during the holidays. However, landlords still need to fill their vacancies.

If you plan on moving and renting, the winter is a perfect time for negotiations. An advertised rental price might suddenly drop if you agree to an immediate move or lease. Practically any part of the deal is negotiable when the landlord wants to recoup his or her loss with no residents assigned to the property.

Ask about lowering the rent, covering utilities and other options. The landlord can always decline the requests, but it never hurts to try your luck.

With this strategy, you save money on almost every detail of the move. As long as the weather holds out, you have smooth sailing ahead.

12. Seeing More Options

In contrast to the warnings against a summertime move, you may want to consider this time of year when residential volume is a concern. You may live in an area that’s impacted with a dense population and few housing choices. When most of the residents put their homes up for sale or move from a rental, you’ll suddenly have choices in your region.

Big cities like Phoenix, AZ or Dallas, TX are notorious for housing shortages. For this reason, thinking about your neighborhood’s housing situation is important when planning for a move. As more people move out, you’ll have additional options and eager sellers or landlords looking for your business.

Remember that you’ll pay a premium with movers to take advantage of these options. That fact must be considered in your overall budget. The options may be worth the extra fees.

Be candid with your movers as you strike a deal and schedule an appointment. When you communicate well with the movers, the entire process can run as smoothly as possible. From going over the route to the new home to cautioning the movers about narrow pathways, all of these details can make or break a successful move.

CALCULATE MY MOVE